LeftLaneNews

De Tomaso sells Deauville license to China

The Deauville was set to usher in a new era for the brand.

De Tomaso revealed the Pininfarina-designed Deauville crossover at the 2011 Geneva Motor Show. It was billed as the car that would bring glory and fame back to the fallen brand.

At the time, the Turin-based company announced that the Deauville had been given the green light for production and would carry a base price of 89,000 euros ($116,500). The future looked promising for the first time since the brand's founder, Alejandro De Tomaso, died in 2003.

However, over the last few months the company has been bogged down with financial issues and has had trouble paying its workers' wages, a situation that in this week's context gives an impresson of déjà vu.

Seeing no light at the end of the tunnel, De Tomaso has caved in and sold the license to build the crossover to an unnamed Chinese company for 12 million euros (approximately $15.6 million).

De Tomaso owner Gian Mario Rossignolo sees the sale as a positive thing. "The sale of the license to build the Deauville is proof that De Tomaso has developed a winning technology," said Rossignolo. "This is the first real agreement allowing De Tomaso to have cash and assets, and it will give a future to the workers who have believed in this project."

The Deauville shown in Geneva was powered by a GM-sourced 300 horsepower turbocharged V6 with a displacement of 2.8 liters. A six-speed automatic transmission sent power to all four wheels.

The Deauville name was introduced in 1971 on a large sedan that looked like the offspring of a Maserati Quattroporte and a Jaguar XJ. It was phased out in 1985 after less than 300 units were produced.

References
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